• ES Picture of the Day 01 2021

    From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Fri Jan 1 11:00:52 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Lunar Fogbow Observed in Saxony, Germany

    January 01, 2021

    Nebelbogen-EPOD

    Photographer: Heiko Ulbricht
    Summary Authors: Heiko Ulbricht; Jim Foster
    For the first time in my life I saw a lunar fogbow, as pictured
    above arching over an agricultural field in Grumbach, Germany. Because
    the Moon was full, this fogbow, also called a cloudbow, was
    easily visible.

    Droplets that form fogbows are only about 1/10 the diameter of
    the raindrops that form rainbows. As a result, there’s greater wave
    interference since the wavelengths of visible light tend to
    overlap within the tiny droplets. This leads to bows that are not only
    wan in appearance but are somewhat wider than rainbows. Photo taken
    on October 31, 2020. Note that as this happened to be a Blue Moon,
    being able to observe this fogbow was a bit more special.
    Photo Details: Canon EOS 6D camera; Sigma ART 24 mm; F2.8; 30-second
    exposure; ISO 400
    * Grumbach, Germany Coordinates: 51.0313, 13.5460

    Related EPODs

    Lunar Fogbow Observed in Saxony, Germany Parisian Sky:
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    Atmospheric Effects Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
    * Color and Light in Nature
    * The Colors of Twillight and Sunset
    * Refraction Index
    * Image Gallery: Atmospheric Effects
    * What is a Rainbow?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 2 weeks, 2 days, 21 hours, 27 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Mon Feb 1 11:00:44 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Lunar Halo Above Evia, Greece

    February 01, 2021

    Moon Halo 2020-11-28

    Photographer: Dimitris Malliaris
    Summary Authors: Dimitris Malliaris; Jim Foster
    Quite often I’m able to photograph interesting atmospheric phenomena
    from the backyard of my house in the central Evia region of Greece. In
    late November 2020, the lunar halo shown above appeared a few hours
    after nightfall. As with their daytime counterparts ( solar halos),
    pencil-shaped, hexagonal ice crystals that compose cirrus
    clouds, and are more or less randomly oriented as they fall, are
    responsible for the ring that encircles the Moon

    Note that to the left of the Moon (between the Moon and the halo) the
    open star cluster called the Pleiades, also known as the Seven
    Sisters, can be seen. Photo taken on November 28, 2020, at 20:59.
    Photo Details: Canon EOS 6D camera; Canon 24-105mm f/4 L IS USM lens;
    24mm focal length; ƒ/5 aperture;; 10 sec. exposure time; ISO:800; Adobe
    Photoshop CC (Windows).
    * Pissonas, Greece Coordinates: 38.5236, 23.8585

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    More...

    Atmospheric Effects Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
    * Color and Light in Nature
    * The Colors of Twillight and Sunset
    * Refraction Index
    * Image Gallery: Atmospheric Effects
    * What is a Rainbow?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 6 weeks, 5 days, 21 hours, 27 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Mon Mar 1 11:00:56 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Orion, Geminid Meteors and Oxena River Waterfall

    March 01, 2021

    Geminidi and Orione Above the Oxena River Falls - The Continuous
    Flow of Energy of the Universe LD

    Photographer: Dario Giannobile
    Summary Authors: Dario Giannobile; Jim Foster

    Shown above is majestic Orion, which when it breaks the horizon in
    fall, is perhaps the most attention-getting constellation.
    Betelgeuse and Rigel hold court on opposing ends of the Great
    Hunter. The orange color of the cold star Betelgeuse and the blue of
    the hot Rigel makes them easy to identify. On clear nights in dark
    locations, a hint of color can be even perceived in the Orion
    Nebula. Note that the celestial equator passes near Orion’s
    Belt, so Orion dominates the night sky in both the Northern and the
    Southern Hemisphere.

    On this long exposure image, the flow of the Oxena River in Sicily,
    Italy, as it plunges over a volcanic caprock, is aslant to the
    paths of the Geminid meteors. Photo taken on December 13, 2020.
    * Oxena River, Italy Coordinates: 37.24804, 14.80097

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    Night Sky Links

    * Space Weather Live
    * Space Weather Live Forum
    * About the Moon
    * American Meteor Society
    * Arbeitskreises Meteore e.V.
    * Global City Lights
    * Heavens Above Home Page
    * The International Meteor Organization
    * Lunar and Planetary Institute
    * MoonConnection
    * NASA Eclipse Web Page
    * Understanding The Moon Phases

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 10 weeks, 5 days, 21 hours, 27 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Thu Apr 1 11:00:46 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Lunar Mirage and Cruise Ship

    April 01, 2021

    Nave-con-falce-di-luna2

    Photographer: Marco Meniero
    Summary Authors: Marco Meniero; Jim Foster

    Shown above is a lunar pedestal that resulted from a lunar mirage
    ( Etruscan Vase or omega mirage) observed over the
    Tyrrhenian Sea, near Rome, Italy. It’s juxtaposed here with a gayly
    painted cruise ship. Mirages such as this are caused by atmospheric
    refraction that occurs when light traverses an unusually warm layer of
    air lying immediately above the sea surface. In order to view these
    sorts of distortions, however, the temperature variation from the
    surface of the sea to a level perhaps 50 ft (15 m) or so above it must
    be quite remarkable. If you look closely you can also detect
    earthshine. Photo taken on January 17, 2021.

    Photo Details: Eos 1DxmK2 camera; Canon EF 400 lens; 2..8 + 1.4X;
    equivalent focal is 900.
    * Rome, Italy Coordinates: 41.883333, 12.5

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    More...

    Atmospheric Effects Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
    * Color and Light in Nature
    * The Colors of Twillight and Sunset
    * Refraction Index
    * Image Gallery: Atmospheric Effects
    * What is a Rainbow?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 6 days, 22 hours, 9 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Tue Jun 1 11:00:28 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Strong Storms Over the Olympic Mountains

    June 01, 2021


    T Storm Olympics

    Photographer: Joe LaCour

    Summary Authors: Joe LaCour; Jim Foster

    I captured this amazing cumulonimbus cloud formation looking south
    from my home near Dungeness, Washington. Though thunderstorms
    aren’t common in the Pacific Northwest, on occasion, convective
    activity above the Olympic Mountains during the late spring and summer
    promotes instability in the lower atmosphere. With sufficient lift and
    wind shear, strong updrafts and downdrafts may form, one of the
    hallmarks of severe thunderstorms. Note that in order to show the
    delicate detail that wasn’t visible on the original un-processed color
    image, this photo, taken on June 7, 2020, has been processed with
    DxO PhotoLab 3.

    Photo details: Leica M9 camera; 35mm Summicron lens; f2; ISO; 160 sec.
    exposure; f/11.


    Dungeness, Washington Coordinates: 48.1468, -123.1232


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    Atmospheric Effects Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
    * Color and Light in Nature
    * The Colors of Twillight and Sunset
    * Refraction Index
    * Image Gallery: Atmospheric Effects
    * What is a Rainbow?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 3 weeks, 4 days, 12 hours, 15 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Thu Jul 1 11:00:32 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Twisted Hoodoo

    July 01, 2021

    TwistedHoodooSkyVerticalSolo_resize

    Photographer: Stan Wagon

    Summary Author: Stan Wagon & Cadan Cummings

    This precarious geologic landform is called the Twisted Hoodoo and it's
    an extreme example of how weathering and erosional processes can lead
    to a striking balancing act. Located in the Grand
    Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah, the Twisted Hoodoo is
    one of thousands of hoodoos in the southwestern United States
    within the Colorado Plateau, with the most well-known areas being
    Bryce Canyon National Park and the Goblin Valley State Park.
    The high prevalence of hoodoos in the Arizona-Utah border region is the
    result of Dakota Sandstone protecting the underlying Entrada
    Sandstone. A product of centuries of erosion and weathering, these
    balancing rock spires are formed when more resistant, harder strata- in
    this case Dakota Sandstone- protect softer, less resistant geologic
    layers- for instance Entrada Sandstone- from wind, rain, and ice. This
    process is further accentuated in and around the Twisted Hoodoo because
    the usual strata of Morrison and Cedar Mountain formations are
    missing from the geologic horizon.

    Photo data: SONY A6500 with 16 mm lens, 1/200 second, f16, ISO100
    * Kane County, Utah Coordinates: 37.15, -111.75

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 7 weeks, 6 days, 12 hours, 15 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sun Aug 1 11:00:28 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Archive - Ridge Line Induced Crepuscular Rays

    July 31, 2021

    6a0105371bb32c970b0134883230c8970c Every weekend we present a
    notable item from our archives. This EPOD was originally published
    October 19, 2010.

    Photographer: Piero Armando

    Summary Author: Piero Armando; Jim Foster

    With a fantastic view of the Italian Alps just to the west of where
    I live, I'm fortunate enough to enjoy many splendid sunsets. The
    photo above lacks the fine colors that results from many such sunsets
    but displays an impressive array of crepuscular rays. Since the sky
    is free of cumulus turrets that often are responsible for rays,
    they must form in another way. In fact, these rays are due to natural
    gaps and prominences along the ridge line as well as the presence of
    dust and haze in the lower atmosphere. These aerosols are very
    effective in scattering sunlight. It's easy to see just where
    sunlight is blocked (spurs) and allowed to stream through (notches).
    Photo taken on September 1, 2010.

    Photo details: Canon EOS 30D camera; manual mode; 1/1000 second
    exposure; F7.1; focal length of 180 mm; image cropped.
    * Turin, Italy Coordinates: 45.066667, 7.7

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    More...

    Atmospheric Effects Links

    * Atmospheric Optics
    * Color and Light in Nature
    * The Colors of Twillight and Sunset
    * Refraction Index
    * Image Gallery: Atmospheric Effects
    * What is a Rainbow?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 12 weeks, 2 days, 12 hours, 15 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Fri Oct 1 11:00:26 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Thunderstorm at Sunrise in Canyonlands National Park

    October 01, 2021


    36466F88-6A4A-4E59-A935-B64E54DDD0D0

    Photographer: Enrique Noriega
    Summary Authors: Enrique Noriega; Jim Foster

    Shown above is a distant thunderstorm as viewed at sunrise through
    Mesa Arch in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. A relatively easy
    walk, Mesa Arch is just ½ mile (0.8 km) from the visitor’s
    parking area. This striking arch took shape when water pooled and
    eventually eroded through bedrock, composed of Navajo sandstone, at
    the edge of the mesa. Photo taken on August 26, 2021
    * Canyonlands Mesa Arch, Utah Coordinates: 38.2136, -109.9025

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    Geography Links

    * Atlapedia Online
    * CountryReports
    * GPS Visualizer
    * Holt Rinehart Winston World Atlas
    * Mapping Our World
    * Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection
    * Types of Land
    * World Mapper

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 4 weeks, 21 hours, 55 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Wed Dec 1 11:00:34 2021
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Geology of Badlands National Park

    December 01, 2021

    1a 2a

    Photographers: Charlene Lanik Sauls, Brian Sauls

    Summary Author: Brian Sauls

    The geology comprising the Badlands National Park in southwestern
    South Dakota is a colorful layer-cake of various sedimentary rocks
    deposited between 28 to 75 million years ago by shallow seas, rivers,
    and wind. The distinct rock layers consist of multi-colored
    sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, claystone,
    limestone, shale, and volcanic ash. Remarkably, the
    volcanic ash originated from volcanoes located over 500 miles (800 km)
    away in present day Nevada and Utah, which was blown eastward before
    settling in the park area. Over time, this deposited ash hardened into
    beige-colored volcanic tuff through the process of
    lithification.

    In addition to geologic deposition, the Badlands Park region was
    further shaped by tectonic forces approximately 5 million years
    ago. The tectonics primarily shifted the underlaying rock strata
    through uplifting and folding forces. Since this period of the geologic
    history, the Badlands has been continually shaped by erosion as it
    has gradually formed the hills, valleys, stream channels, and other
    interesting features of this park. Because the rock layers are
    relatively soft, erosion occurs at a high rate of about one inch per
    year. At this rapid rate of erosion, estimates suggest that the hills
    of the Badlands will erode completely within the next half a million
    years. Photos taken in August 2021.
    * Badlands National Park, South Dakota Coordinates: 43.8554,
    -102.3397

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 2 weeks, 5 days, 16 hours, 25 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)