• ES Picture of the Day 03 2022

    From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Mon Jan 3 11:01:14 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Gingham Skirt Butte

    January 03, 2022


    PariaTownGinghamSkirtButte

    Photographer: Stan Wagon

    Summary Author: Stan Wagon

    Featured above is Gingham Skirt Butte in the Grand Staircase
    Escalante National Monument of Utah. The Chinle (sandstone)
    Formation, of the upper Triassic period, underlies the more solid
    cliff-forming Wingate and Moenave formations throughout the
    Colorado Plateau. It’s often overlooked by hikers in the region as
    it’s unpleasant to walk upon. However, the colorfully-banded
    Petrified Forest Member (above the butte’s base) of the Chinle
    Formation is be visually stunning.

    This location is part of the Paria western movie set (known as Old
    Paria). Sandstone found here consists of sediments moved by water,
    either large rivers or tidal basins, as opposed to the wind-formed
    sandstones of its Wingate and Moenave neighbor. Dinosaur fossils, teeth
    and bones, have been uncovered beneath the Gingham Skirt. This name
    was given by early Mormon settlers at the townsite established on
    the Paria River, which is just below the butte. Photo taken on
    October 21, 2021.

    Photo details: Sony A6500 camera; 27 mm lens; f/14; 1/250 second
    exposure; ISO 160.
    * Old Paria Ghost Town, Kane County, Utah Coordinates:
    37.248333, -111.949167

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
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    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 4 weeks, 1 day, 20 hours, 43 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Thu Feb 3 11:01:46 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Quercia delle Streghe Downy Oak

    February 03, 2022

    IMG_5968-Pano-Modifica-Modifica-2(1)

    Photographer: Fabio Di Stefano

    Summary Author: Fabio Di Stefano

    This picture showcases the Quercia delle Streghe tree located in
    the town of Capannori, Italy. The tree is a spectacular example of
    a downy white oak (Quercus pubescens) - the most common species of
    oak in Italy- and it is estimated to be 600 years old. A unique
    trait that separates this tree from other downy oaks is its limbs grow
    horizontally to ground. In this panoramic image, obtained from the
    composition of four shots, I tried to give an idea of ​​the size of the
    oak trunk as well as how far its branches extend horizontally. Overall,
    the tree is over 50 feet (15 meters) tall and has a trunk
    circumference of approximately 13 feet (4 meters). At its crown,
    the tree is estimated to be over 130 feet (40 meters) in diameter.
    These dimensions make the Quercia delle Streghe one of the largest
    trees in Tuscany.
    * Capannori, Lucca, Italy Coordinates: 43.8681, 10.6485

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    Plant Links

    * Discover Life
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    * USDA Plants Database
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    * Plants in Motion
    * What Tree is It?

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 8 weeks, 4 days, 20 hours, 44 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sun Apr 3 12:01:00 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Archive - Mud Cracks near Trona, California

    April 02, 2022

    https://epod.usra.edu/.a/6a0105371bb32c970b0148c690473a970c-pi

    Every weekend we present a notable item from our archives.

    This EPOD was originally published on December 13, 2010.

    Photographer: Stan Celestian
    Summary Author: Stan Celestian

    Mud cracks are ephemeral sedimentary features found not
    just in dry lands but also in a variety of locations and climates. The
    cracks featured above were found in a desert wash near Trona,
    California. A rare rain event had flooded the area forming pools of
    sediment-laden water. As the sediment settled, the heavier
    coarse-grained particles collected on the bottom first, followed by
    finer and finer grained sediments. The last to accumulate was the
    finest clay particles. After the pooled water evaporated, the
    sediments began to dry out. The surface clay contained the most water
    and shrank the most as it dried, resulting in the upward curl of the
    mud cracks. Note the coarser, deeper material between the cracks. Photo
    taken on October 12, 2010.

    Photo details: Camera Maker: NIKON CORPORATION; Camera Model: NIKON
    D200; Focal Length: 55mm (35mm equivalent: 82mm); Aperture: f/9.0;
    Exposure Time: 0.0031 s (1/320); ISO equiv: 100; Exposure Bias: none;
    Metering Mode: Center Weight; Exposure: program (Auto); White Balance:
    Manual; Light Source: Fine Weather; Flash Fired: No.
    * The Pinnacles near Trona, California Coordinates: 35.617134,
    -117.368360

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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
    * USGS/NPS Geologic Glossary
    * USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 4 weeks, 6 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Tue May 3 12:01:08 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Rainbow Swamp

    May 03, 2022

    6E91DB78-18F2-4DE8-B59E-005515A3B5A5

    Photographer: Daniel Widner

    Summary Authors: Daniel Widner; Cadan Cummings

    The photo above features two types of rainbow effects, one an artifact
    of the camera and the other a unique biological process. As part of
    the nutrient cycle, swamps are constantly growing and recycling
    energy and matter. When a plant dies or leaves drop in the fall, the
    vegetation begins decaying before eventually bacteria and other
    decomposers break it down to acquire nutrients they need to
    survive. In the case of the swamp above, natural oils were produced by
    decomposing vegetation as well as possible from anaerobic bacteria
    reducing iron in the soil. This resulted in a thin film being created
    on the surface of the swamp, visible as a rainbow of different pastel
    hues. For the multicolored layer to be so noticeable, the waters must
    have been still long enough for the oils to separate out of the water.

    Visible in the top of the image is an equally colorful lens flare
    caused by an internal reflection within the camera. This type of image
    artifact is common under bright light and highly reflective conditions.
    Although inadvertent, the lens flare gives the photo a unique look
    combined with this already colorful and unusual microbial process.
    * Charles City County, Virginia Coordinates: 37.402, -77.148

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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 9 weeks, 1 day, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Fri Jun 3 12:01:02 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    The Bolide: Make a "Very Light" Wish

    June 03, 2022

    8850 t bolide fb

    Photographer: Orazio Mezzio

    Summary Author: Orazio Mezzio; Cadan Cummings

    Earlier this year, I was able to observe and photograph a rare
    manifestation of a shooting star: the bolide. Oftentimes
    interchangeably called a fireball, a bolide is a fragment of rock,
    comet, or asteroid that burns up or explodes in Earth’s upper
    atmosphere. These objects are still considered meteors, but are
    much larger in size and brightness. Their brilliant flare (around
    apparent magnitude -14 or brighter) is produced as the object
    careens through the atmosphere and disintegrates as the surface weakens
    due to incredible external pressure. As is seen in the photo above, the
    bolide is bright even compared to the red supergiant Antares and
    the other stars in the constellation Scorpius.
    * Noto, Province of Syracuse, Italy Coordinates: 36.892, 15.065

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    * Lunar and Planetary Institute
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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 13 weeks, 4 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sun Jul 3 12:01:16 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Culburra Beach Sand Layers Following Wildfires

    July 02, 2022


    Ash in Sand 2

    Photographer: John Lupton
    Summary Author: John Lupton

    The photo above was taken two and a half years after major
    wildfires on the east coast of Australia (late 2019 through to
    early 2020) burned approximately 65,600 sq. miles (70,000 sq. km.).
    It’s estimated that over a billion mammals, reptiles and birds were
    killed. The south coast of New South Wales and eastern coast of
    Victoria were particularly hit hard. During that time, rivers in the
    region had a floating layer of blackened leaves and ash that washed
    down to the sea. From personal experience, it was nigh impossible to
    swim or see the bottom in normally crystal-clear waters.

    The Shoalhaven River flushed down significant sums of ash to the
    sea. On the photo, captured at Culburra Beach in New South Wales,
    note the clear line of ash deposit, between sand layers, that were laid
    down during this wildfire episode. Erosion, because of the denuded
    landscape and also from extreme surf conditions as a result of an
    east coast low pressure systems, removed over 80% of the beach’s
    sand, exposing these layers. The upper layer relates to the 2019~2020
    wildfire, while the lower relates to a lesser fire season in February
    2017. These sand cliffs, though revealing very recent wildfire history
    nonetheless demonstrate the impact of the fires on the local
    environment and are a pointer to their lasting impact for years to
    come. Photo taken on April 4, 2022.
    * Culburra Beach, New South Wales, Australia Coordinates: -34.9305,
    150.7580

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    Geology Links

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    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 17 weeks, 6 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Wed Aug 3 12:01:06 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Mantling on Utah’s Hogback Ridge

    August 03, 2022

    TomMc_EPOD.MantlingHogbackRidgeUtahMcGuire (002)

    TomMc_EPOD.LowerCalfCreekFallsMcGuire (4) (002)_a

    Photographer: Thomas McGuire

    Summary Author: Thomas McGuire

    For 5 miles (8 km), Utah’s Route 12. between Escalante and Boulder,
    Utah, follows the narrow 1,000 ft (305 m) high Hogback Ridge of
    Navajo Sandstone. Spectacular long views on either side of this
    highway show tan-to-white-to-yellow Navajo 'slickrock'. The ridge
    is also bounded by deep canyons: One is Calf Creek, with two impressive
    waterfalls (bottom photo); on the opposite side is Boulder Creek,
    with narrow slot canyons.

    But there’s a clear sign of something missing. Part of the ridge is
    strewn with giant boulders of basalt. Clearly there were lava flows
    that covered the Navajo Sandstone along an unknown part of the ridge
    and probably much more. For most of the 5 miles (8 km), all that’s left
    are the lava-boulders mantling the sandstone.

    Basalt is very resistant to weathering and erosion, so it forms the
    cap rock of many flat-topped mesas in the Southwest. As the sides of
    the mesa erode back, basalt boulders fall from the top and cover the
    slopes along with the underlying rock type that make up the body of the
    mesa. An observer can be forgiven for thinking the whole mountain is
    basalt when the bulk of the bedrock is hidden beneath its thin mantle
    of basalt and boulders, which will completely erode away with
    (geologic) time. When this happens, there’ll be no record of the lava
    flows that once covered significant areas around Hogback Ridge.


    Hogback Ridge, Utah Coordinates: 37.8144, -111.4091


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    Geology Links

    * Earthquakes
    * Geologic Time
    * Geomagnetism
    * General Dictionary of Geology
    * Mineral and Locality Database
    * Mohs Scale of Mineral Hardness
    * This Dynamic Earth
    * USGS
    * MyShake - University of California, Berkeley
    * USGS Ask a Geologist
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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 22 weeks, 2 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sat Sep 3 12:01:08 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Mount Etna Eruption of May 29, 2022

    September 02, 2022

    Gianni TUMINO Colata 01_06_2022_Riposto_JPG_LOGO_2040pix

    Gianni TUMINO Colata 02_06_2022_MILO_JPG_LOGO_2040PIX

    Photographer: Giovanni Tumino

    Summary Author: Giovanni Tumino

    During one of the numerous paroxysms of Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy), I
    decided to spend the night filming the lava flow it generated. This
    flow emanated from a new eruptive mouth that opened at
    approximately the 2,800 m (9,186 ft) level on May 29, 2022. Though
    these flows look ominous, fortunately the Bove Valley acts as a
    container for the lava flow that would otherwise pour over the Etnean
    towns. Photos taken on June 2, 2022.

    Riposto, Sicily, Italy Coordinates: 37.73140, 15.20916

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 26 weeks, 5 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Mon Oct 3 12:01:14 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Emerald Lakes, New Zealand

    October 03, 2022


    Emerald lake tongariro

    Photographer: Steve Kropp
    Summary Author: Steve Kropp

    This photo shows one of the two Emerald Lakes found near the summit
    of Mt Tongariro, New Zealand. Their stunning emerald color is
    caused by dissolved minerals that wash down from the surrounding
    landscape.

    The lakes formed in craters from previous volcanic eruptions. They can
    be seen on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing, which is one of the most
    popular day walks in New Zealand. This walk passes over the volcanic
    terrain of still active volcano Mt Tongariro. It also passes the base
    of Mt Ngauruhoe, another active volcano that was used to depict
    Mt Doom in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy. Photo taken on
    April 16, 2022.
    Photo details: Google Pixel 4a; ƒ/1.73; 1/2611; 4.38 mm; ISO 61

    Emerald Lakes, New Zealand Coordinates: -39.133314, 175.657835

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 31 weeks, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)
  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sat Dec 3 11:01:12 2022
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Cumulus Clouds with Spikes

    December 02, 2022


    IMG_0290

    IMG_3739

    Photographer: Mila Zinkova

    Summary Author: Mila Zinkova; Jim Foster

    Shown above are curious shaped, cumulus clouds that were observed
    from near my home in San Francisco, California, on April 19, 2022. The
    spike-like features have horseshoe shapes in some cases, as shown in
    the bottom photo. Perhaps these spikes and horseshoes are caused by
    convection -- intense localized heating of the most optically
    thick portion of cloud by the strong April sun. However, because the
    atmospheric environment where the clouds formed wasn't suitable
    ( stable atmosphere) for widespread building, they remained overall
    fairly “flat” in appearance. Click here to see a video of these
    clouds.

    San Francisco, California Coordinates: 37.7749, -122.4194


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    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

    --- up 39 weeks, 5 days, 21 minutes
    * Origin: -=> Castle Rock BBS <=- Now Husky HPT Powered! (21:1/186)