• ES Picture of the Day 19 2020

    From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Thu Nov 19 11:00:32 2020
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    The Mouth of the Gooseberry River

    November 19, 2020


    6a0105371bb32c970b026bdea1f4a3200c

    Photographer: Dale Hugo
    Summary Author: Dale Hugo

    Seen above is the Gooseberry River, Minnesota as it empties into
    Lake Superior. The beach is mostly rhyolite. The sturdy
    basalt-built pump house on top of the patio at center-right was
    completed in 1940 by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), which
    built most of the park back in the late '30s. The park offices
    and buildings including the interpretive center were closed this day
    due to COVID-19 restrictions, but the trails were open. This photo
    was taken from the Gitchie-Gummi trail on the north side of the
    river. Drainage basins of the rivers on the North Shore are
    small, so during dry spells, the rivers' flow is pretty low. Rivers
    closer to Canada have large drainage basins and, therefore steadier,
    stronger flows; less affected by droughts. The basalt pillars on the
    lava rock ledge extending out into Lake Superior were built by the CCC
    and support massive chains between them. They're about 6 feet (2 m)
    high. On a summer day, many people would be on the rocks and beach
    searching for agates and skipping stones.
    * Gooseberry River, Minnesota Coordinates: 47.142778, -91.456944

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    Geography Links

    * Atlapedia Online
    * CountryReports
    * GPS Visualizer
    * Holt Rinehart Winston World Atlas
    * Mapping Our World
    * Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection
    * Types of Land
    * World Mapper

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

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  • From Black Panther@21:1/186 to All on Sat Dec 19 11:00:40 2020
    EPOD - a service of USRA

    The Earth Science Picture of the Day (EPOD) highlights the diverse processes and phenomena which shape our planet and our lives. EPOD will collect and archive photos, imagery, graphics, and artwork with short explanatory
    captions and links exemplifying features within the Earth system. The
    community is invited to contribute digital imagery, short captions and
    relevant links.


    Archive - Blue Light From Deep Snow

    December 19, 2020

    Bluesnow

    Every weekend we present a notable item from our archives. This EPOD
    was originally published December 22, 2003.

    Provided by: Cindy Foster
    Summary authors & editors: Jim Foster

    After a big snowstorm, when you're shoveling your walkway or just
    measuring how much snow fell, have you ever noticed a turquoise or
    robin egg blue color? The color isn't due to blue snowflakes nor is it
    a result of the same process responsible for making the sky look blue.
    Rather it results from the optics of large, non-spherical particles. If
    new-fallen snow is more than about 10 inches (25 cm) deep, the myriad
    snow crystals both scatter and absorb sunlight (even on an overcast
    day). The longer wavelengths (red and yellow) of visible light are more
    readily absorbed than are the shorter wavelengths (greens and blues).
    Eventually, the red light is completely absorbed, and only blue light
    emerges when a hole is poked into the snow. If the hole is deep enough,
    the blue color completely disappears since all of the light will be
    absorbed.

    The photo above was taken last February in Silver Spring, Maryland the
    day after a powerful nor'easter buried portions of the Middle Atlantic
    region and New England under nearly 2 feet (60 cm) of snow. Anytime
    this thick mantle of snow was jabbed with a yardstick, blue light was
    liberated. Here's hoping that you have a nice Christmas and that no
    blue snowflakes start falling or blue memories come calling.


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    Cryosphere Links

    * Guide to Frost
    * What is the Cryosphere?
    * Bentley Snow Crystals
    * Glaciers of the World
    * Ice, Snow, and Glaciers: The Water Cycle
    * The National Snow and Ice Data Center Google Earth Images
    * Snow and Ice Crystals

    -
    Earth Science Picture of the Day is a service of the Universities
    Space Research Association.

    https://epod.usra.edu

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